CGRN 95

Small sacrificial regulation for Mnemosyne at Athens

Date :

end of 4th century BC

Justification: lettering (Meritt, Curbera).

Provenance

Athens . Found as part of the wall of a modern house over the Heliaia.

Support

Part of a large block of Pentelic marble, broken on all sides.

  • Height: 25 cm
  • Width: 30 cm
  • Depth: 15 cm

Layout

Letters:

Line 1: 2.5 cm high.

Line 2: 1.2 cm high.

Bibliography

Edition here based on Meritt 1963: 46 no. 62. See now Curbera IG II³ 4, 1759.

Cf. also: Sokolowski LSCG 26; SEG 21, 786.

Further bibliography: Bruit Zaidman 2005: 38.

Text


[Μνη]μοσύνη[ι]
[ἀρεστῆ]ρα [καὶ] κηρία.

Translation

To Mnemosyne.

One propitiatory cake and honeycombs.

Traduction

À Mnemosyne.

Un gâteau propitiatoire et des rayons de miel.

Commentary

This 4th-century text is part of a group of mostly short inscriptions (e.g. CGRN 53 and CGRN 54), found in Piraeus and in or near the city Asklepieion of Athens, prescribing the (preliminary) offering of cakes to various divinities. Meritt connects the cult of Mnemosyne in this inscription to a sanctuary of Dionysus discussed by Pausanias (1.2.5) at the north-west entrance of the Athenian Agora. This god was honoured together with other deities: Athena Paionia, Zeus, Mnemosyne, the Muses, and Apollo.

The offerings of the cake ἀρεστήρ and honeycomb often go together. The inscription CGRN 54, Face B, lines 1-8, found at Piraeus, prescribes an ἀρεστῆρ[α] and a κηρίον for Helios and Mnemosyne. Another one, CGRN 53, found at Piraeus, prescribes ἀρεστῆρας and κηρία for the Moirai. The inscription CGRN 87, found on Samos, prescribes ἀρεστῆρας and κηρία for Kourotrophos and Hermes. Sokolowski supplies [ἀρεστῆ]ρα [καὶ] in this inscription, but as pointed out in SEG 25, 231 [ἀρεστῆ]ρα[ς καὶ] (plural) may be more likely. Cp. CGRN 54, with two singular forms: Μνημοσύνηι ἀρεσ[τῆ]ρα κηρίον, and CGRN 53, with two plural forms: Μοίραις ἀρεστῆρας ΙΙΙ κηρία ΙΙΙ. The name of the cake called ἀρεστήρ is derived from the verb ἀρέσκω, "to appease, conciliate", and should be seen as a propitiatory gesture. Bruit Zaidman explains that honey has an "appeasing" (sweetening) function too.

Publication

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike International License 4.0 .

All citation, reuse or distribution of this work must contain somewhere a link back to the DOI (https://doi.org/10.54510/CGRN95), as well as the year of consultation (see “Home” for details on how to cite or click “Export Citation” to create a reference for this specific file).

Authors

  • Jan-Mathieu Carbon
  • Saskia Peels
  • Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge

How To Cite

Brief citation of the Greek text : CGRN 95, lines x-x.

Reference to the file as a critical study of the inscription : Jan-Mathieu Carbon, Saskia Peels et Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge, "CGRN 95: Small sacrificial regulation for Mnemosyne at Athens", in Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN), 2017-, consulted on May 28, 2024. URL: http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/file/95/; DOI: https://doi.org/10.54510/CGRN95.

Full citation of the CGRN in a list of abbreviations or a bibliography is the following : Jan-Mathieu Carbon, Saskia Peels-Matthey, Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge, Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN), 2017-, consulted on May 28, 2024. URL: http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be; DOI: https://doi.org/10.54510/CGRN0.

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                <p> Edition here based on <bibl type="author_date" n="Meritt 1963">Meritt 1963</bibl>: 46 no. 62. See now Curbera <bibl type="abbr" n="IG II³">IG II³</bibl> 4, 1759.
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                <p> Cf. also:
                Sokolowski <bibl type="abbr" n="LSCG">LSCG</bibl> 26; <bibl type="abbr" n="SEG">SEG</bibl> 21, 786.</p>
      
        <p> Further bibliography: 
            <bibl type="author_date" n="Bruit Zaidman 2005">Bruit Zaidman 2005</bibl>: 38.
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<lb xml:id="line_1" n="1"/> <name type="deity" key="Mnemosyne"><w lemma="Μνημοσύνη"><supplied reason="lost">Μνη</supplied>μοσύνη<supplied reason="lost">ι</supplied></w></name> 
                    
<lb xml:id="line_2" n="2"/> <name type="bakery"><w lemma="ἀρεστήρ"><supplied reason="lost">ἀρεστῆ</supplied>ρα</w></name> <supplied reason="lost">καὶ</supplied> <name type="liquid"><name type="vegetal"><w lemma="κηρίον">κηρία</w></name></name>.
                    
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                <p>To Mnemosyne.</p> 
                <p>One propitiatory cake and honeycombs.
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                <p>À Mnemosyne.</p> 
                <p>Un gâteau propitiatoire et des rayons de miel.
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<p>This 4th-century text is part of a group of mostly short inscriptions (e.g. <ref target="CGRN_53">CGRN 53</ref> and <ref target="CGRN_54">CGRN 54</ref>), found in Piraeus and in or near the city Asklepieion of Athens, prescribing the (preliminary) offering of cakes to various divinities. Meritt connects the cult of Mnemosyne in this inscription to a sanctuary of Dionysus discussed by Pausanias (1.2.5) at the north-west entrance of the Athenian Agora. This god was honoured together with other deities: Athena Paionia, Zeus, Mnemosyne, the Muses, and Apollo.</p>
                
<p> The offerings of the cake ἀρεστήρ and honeycomb often go together. The inscription <ref target="CGRN_54">CGRN 54</ref>, Face B, lines 1-8, found at Piraeus, prescribes an ἀρεστῆρ[α] and a κηρίον for Helios and Mnemosyne. Another one, <ref target="CGRN_53">CGRN 53</ref>, found at Piraeus, prescribes ἀρεστῆρας and κηρία for the Moirai. The inscription <ref target="CGRN_87">CGRN 87</ref>, found on Samos, prescribes ἀρεστῆρας and κηρία for Kourotrophos and Hermes. Sokolowski supplies [ἀρεστῆ]ρα [καὶ] in this inscription, but as pointed out in <bibl type="abbr" n="SEG">SEG</bibl> 25, 231 [ἀρεστῆ]ρα[ς καὶ] (plural) may be more likely. Cp. <ref target="CGRN_54">CGRN 54</ref>, with two singular forms: Μνημοσύνηι ἀρεσ[τῆ]ρα κηρίον, and <ref target="CGRN_53">CGRN 53</ref>, with two plural forms: Μοίραις ἀρεστῆρας ΙΙΙ κηρία ΙΙΙ. The name of the cake called ἀρεστήρ is derived from the verb ἀρέσκω, "to appease, conciliate", and should be seen as a propitiatory gesture. Bruit Zaidman explains that honey has an "appeasing" (sweetening) function too.             </p>
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