CGRN 178

Sacrificial regulation for Peitho on Thasos

Date :

ca. 200-100 BC

Justification: lettering (Picard; Hiller von Gaertringen).

Provenance

Thasos . Found in the area of the Prytaneion. Current location unknown, but perhaps in the Museum of Thasos.

Support

Marble block, of intact length, but damaged to the right. On the left side, there is anathyrosis, indicating that the block was set into a wall or structure of some sort.

  • Height: 26 cm
  • Width: 36 cm
  • Depth: 25.5 cm

Layout

The field in which the inscription is engraved is fairly deeply set, as a sort of cartouche.

Letters: 2.3 cm high.

Bibliography

Edition here based on Picard 1923: 244.

Other edition: Hiller von Gaertringen IG XII.Suppl. 394.

Cf. also: Sokolowski LSS 73.

Further bibliography: Seyrig 1927: 197; Pirenne-Delforge 1991; Pirenne-Delforge 1994.

Text


Πειθοῖ αἶγα οὐ-
δὲ
χοῖρον οὐ θέμ[ις].

Translation

To Peitho neither a goat nor swine (literally: a piglet) is religiously permitted.

Traduction

Pour Peitho, ni un caprin ni un porcin (littéralement: porcelet) ne sont religieusement permis.

Commentary

This short text is a sacrificial regulation of a type regularly found on Thasos; it would have been set up directly at the cult-site, as a sign for worshippers; and it consists in a form of interdiction (οὐ θέμις, line 2) which is widely prevalent on the island (cf. also Seyrig). In particular, the sacrifice of goats and piglets, or more probably and more broadly, swine in general, is prohibited in a multiplicity of cults known on Thasos: cf. here CGRN 17 (no piglets, or swine more generally, for the Nymphs or Apollo; for the Charites, the same restrictions as for Peitho); CGRN 23 (no goats for Hera); CGRN 27 (the same interdictions for Heracles as for Peitho).

The figure of Peitho, the goddess personifying persuasion, is attested already in Hesiod, where she adorns Pandora together with the Graces (Op. 73-75). As a feminine power, she is often associated with Aphrodite and the Charites (Peitho and the Graces: cf. Sokolowski; Peitho and Aphrodite: cf. Pirenne-Delforge 1991 and 1994). On Thasos, the cult of the Charites had the same sacrificial restrictions as the cult of Peitho (see again CGRN 17), which may suggest a connection between the cults of these goddesses. However, given the findspot of the inscription near the prytaneion, it might also be tempting to think that Peitho was worshipped here as a goddess of rhetorical (rather than sexual) persuasion, with her cult-site close to the center of the city and its political institutions (for the cult of Peitho by magistrates, see esp. Pirenne-Delforge 1994: 471); for the cult of Peitho in the present Collection, cf. notably CGRN 136, with a mention of "statues" (plural) in the sanctuary of Aphrodite Pandemos in Athens, again in a strongly civic context.

Publication

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike International License 4.0 .

All citation, reuse or distribution of this work must contain somewhere a link back to the URL http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/ and the filename, as well as the year of consultation (see “Home” for details of how to cite).

Authors

  • Jan-Mathieu Carbon
  • Saskia Peels

Project Director

Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge

How To Cite

CGRN 178, l. x-x.

Alternatively, a more detailed version of this citation, with the relevant URL, can be:
CGRN 178, l. x-x (http://cgrn.philo.ulg.ac.be/file/178/).

The full citation of the CGRN in a list of abbreviations or a bibliography is the following:
J.-M. Carbon, S. Peels and V. Pirenne-Delforge, Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN), Liège 2015- (http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be, consulted in [2019]).

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					<p>Edition here based on <bibl type="author_date" n="Picard 1923">Picard 1923</bibl>: 244.</p>
					<p>Other edition: Hiller von Gaertringen <bibl type="abbr" n="IG XII.Suppl.">IG XII.Suppl.</bibl> 394.</p>
					<p>Cf. also: Sokolowski <bibl type="abbr" n="LSS">LSS</bibl> 73.</p>
					<p>Further bibliography: <bibl type="author_date" n="Seyrig 1927">Seyrig 1927</bibl>: 197; <bibl type="author_date" n="Pirenne-Delforge 1991">Pirenne-Delforge 1991</bibl>; <bibl type="author_date" n="Pirenne-Delforge 1994">Pirenne-Delforge 1994</bibl>.</p>
					
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	    				<head>Text</head>
	    				<ab>
	    					
	    					<lb xml:id="line_1" n="1"/><name type="deity" key="Peitho"><w lemma="Πειθώ">Πειθοῖ</w></name> <name type="animal" key="goat"><w lemma="αἴξ">αἶγα</w></name> <w lemma="οὐδέ">οὐ
	    					
	    					<lb xml:id="line_2" n="2" break="no"/>δὲ</w> <name type="animal" key="swine"><name type="age"><w lemma="χοῖρος">χοῖρον</w></name></name> <w lemma="οὐ">οὐ</w> <name type="authority"><w lemma="θέμις">θέμ<supplied reason="lost">ις</supplied></w></name>.
		
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					<head>Translation</head>
	    				<p>To Peitho neither a goat nor swine (literally: a piglet) is religiously permitted.</p>
					
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					<head>Traduction</head>
					<p>Pour Peitho, ni un caprin ni un porcin (littéralement: porcelet) ne sont religieusement permis.</p>
					
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						<head>Commentary</head>    
<p>This short text is a sacrificial regulation of a type regularly found on Thasos; it would have been set up directly at the cult-site, as a sign for worshippers; and it consists in a form of interdiction (οὐ θέμις, line 2) which is widely prevalent on the island (cf. also Seyrig). In particular, the sacrifice of goats and piglets, or more probably and more broadly, swine in general, is prohibited in a multiplicity of cults known on Thasos: cf. here <ref target="CGRN_17">CGRN 17</ref> (no piglets, or swine more generally, for the Nymphs or Apollo; for the Charites, the same restrictions as for Peitho); <ref target="http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/CGRN_23">CGRN 23</ref> (no goats for Hera); <ref target="http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/CGRN_27">CGRN 27</ref> (the same interdictions for Heracles as for Peitho).</p>
						
<p>The figure of Peitho, the goddess personifying persuasion, is attested already in Hesiod, where she adorns Pandora together with the Graces (<title>Op.</title> 73-75). As a feminine power, she is often associated with Aphrodite and the Charites (Peitho and the Graces: cf. Sokolowski; Peitho and Aphrodite: cf. Pirenne-Delforge 1991 and 1994). On Thasos, the cult of the Charites had the same sacrificial restrictions as the cult of Peitho (see again <ref target="CGRN_17">CGRN 17</ref>), which may suggest a connection between the cults of these goddesses. However, given the findspot of the inscription near the prytaneion, it might also be tempting to think that Peitho was worshipped here as a goddess of rhetorical (rather than sexual) persuasion, with her cult-site close to the center of the city and its political institutions (for the cult of Peitho by magistrates, see esp. Pirenne-Delforge 1994: 471); for the cult of Peitho in the present Collection, cf. notably <ref target="CGRN_136">CGRN 136</ref>, with a mention of "statues" (plural) in the sanctuary of Aphrodite Pandemos in Athens, again in a strongly civic context.</p>
						
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