CGRN 173

Small purity regulation from Delos

Date :

2nd or 1st century BC

Justification: lettering (Roussel).

Provenance

Delos . See support above for further discussion.

Support

White marble block, a rough stone polished only on the side on which we find the inscription. Previously united with another block through an oblique nail, and forming with that stone one of the angles of a structure, of which these stones were the only remains (cf. Roussel). This structure was part of the Sarapieion C of Delos, in the Inopos river valley. Sarapieion C, the major sanctuary of Egyptian gods on Delos, was not far away from Sarapieia A and B, and also bordered with the Sanctuary of the Oriental Gods at its eastern end.

  • Height: 25 cm
  • Width: 45 cm
  • Depth: unknown

Layout

Letters: 2 cm high.

Bibliography

Edition here based on Roussel IG XI.4 1300.

Other editions: Hauvette-Besnault 1882: 350 no. 79; Roussel 1916: no. 50.

Cf. also: Sokolowski LSCG 94; Ziehen LGS II 90; Guarducci 1978: 123.

Further bibliography: Bruneau 1970; Parker 1983; Siard 2003; Harris 2015.

Text


ἀπ' οἴνου μὴ προσιέναι
μηδὲ ἐν ἀνθινοῖς.

Translation

Do not come after drinking or in bright-coloured clothes.

Traduction

Ne pas approcher en état d'ébriété ni en vêtements aux couleurs vives.

Commentary

This small regulation from Sarapieion C (on which cf. Siard) should belong to the cult of an Egyptian deity on Delos, perhaps that of Isis (Hauvette-Besnault), though other gods are entirely possible; see immediately below. The history of the sanctuary goes back to the early third century BC, and we know that Isis and Sarapis were worshipped here from this time (cf. Bruneau and Roussel). The stone was connected to another stone with a nail, on which we find a dedication to Zeus and Meter Megale on the command of Osiris. On this category of text as a sort of ‘warning sign’, see Harris, p. 58-60.

Line 1: As Plutarch describes (De Is. Os. 6), wine was strictly forbidden in the cult of Isis.

Line 2: 'Flowery' garments may refer to clothing with flowers embroidered on them, or simply, to brightly-coloured or luxurious clothes. These are also forbidden in the cult of Despoina at Lykosoura: cf. CGRN 126, lines 3-6. Brightly-coloured clothes and other forms of luxury were also forbidden during the festival of Demeter at Dyme: cf. CGRN 127, lines 5-6. Such rules seem aimed at curbing ostentation and promoting simplicity of dress; as Parker (p. 83 n. 36) explains, bright-coloured clothing may mark out a prostitute. Cp. also the schol. on Sophocles' OC 684 (referring again to Demeter).

Publication

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike International License 4.0 .

All citation, reuse or distribution of this work must contain somewhere a link back to the URL http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/ and the filename, as well as the year of consultation (see “Home” for details of how to cite).

Authors

  • Jan-Mathieu Carbon
  • Saskia Peels

Project Director

Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge

How To Cite

CGRN 173, l. x-x.

Alternatively, a more detailed version of this citation, with the relevant URL, can be:
CGRN 173, l. x-x (http://cgrn.philo.ulg.ac.be/file/173/).

The full citation of the CGRN in a list of abbreviations or a bibliography is the following:
J.-M. Carbon, S. Peels and V. Pirenne-Delforge, Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN), Liège 2015- (http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be, consulted in [2020]).

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	    			<author>Jan-Mathieu Carbon</author>
	    			<author>Saskia Peels</author>
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		<p>White marble <rs type="objectType">block</rs>, a rough stone polished only on the side on which we find the inscription. Previously united with another block through an oblique nail, and forming with that stone one of the angles of a structure, of which these stones were the only remains (cf. Roussel). This structure was part of the Sarapieion C of Delos, in the Inopos river valley. Sarapieion C, the major sanctuary of Egyptian gods on Delos, was not far away from Sarapieia A and B, and also bordered with the Sanctuary of the Oriental Gods at its eastern end. 
		
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							<p><origDate notBefore="-0200" notAfter="-0001">2nd or 1st century BC</origDate></p>
							
		<p><desc>Justification: lettering (Roussel).</desc></p>
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						<provenance><p><placeName key="Delos" n="Aegean_Islands"><ref target="http://pleiades.stoa.org/places/599588" type="external">Delos</ref></placeName>. See support above for further discussion.</p>
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	    			<head>Bibliography</head>
	 
<p> 
	Edition here based on Roussel <bibl type="abbr" n="IG XI">IG XI</bibl>.4 1300.
	    			</p>
	    			<p> Other editions:                   
	    	<bibl type="author_date" n="Hauvette - Besnault 1882">Hauvette-Besnault 1882</bibl>: 350 no. 79;
	    	<bibl type="author_date" n="Roussel 1916">Roussel 1916</bibl>: no. 50.		
	    			</p>
	    			
	    			<p> Cf. also:
	    				Sokolowski <bibl type="abbr" n="LSCG">LSCG</bibl> 94; 
	    				Ziehen <bibl type="abbr" n="LGS II">LGS II</bibl> 90;
	    				<bibl type="author_date" n="Guarducci 1978">Guarducci 1978</bibl>: 123.
	    			</p>
	    			
	    			<p> Further bibliography: 
	    				<bibl type="author_date" n="Bruneau 1970">Bruneau 1970</bibl>;
	    				<bibl type="author_date" n="Parker 1983">Parker 1983</bibl>;
	    				<bibl type="author_date" n="Siard 2003">Siard 2003</bibl>;
	    				<bibl type="author_date" n="Harris 2015">Harris 2015</bibl>.
	    				
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					<head>Text</head>
	    				
	    			<ab>
	    	
	    	
	    				<lb xml:id="line_1" n="1"/> <w lemma="ἀπό">ἀπ'</w> <w lemma="οἶνος">οἴνου</w> <w lemma="μή">μὴ</w> <w lemma="πρόσειμι">προσιέναι</w>
	    				
	    				<lb xml:id="line_2" n="2"/> <w lemma="μηδέ">μηδὲ</w> <w lemma="ἐν">ἐν</w> <name type="clothing"><name type="colour2"><w lemma="ἄνθινος">ἀνθινοῖς</w></name></name>.
	    
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					<head>Translation</head>
					<p> 
						Do not come after drinking or in bright-coloured clothes.</p>
					</div>
				<div type="translation" xml:lang="fre">
					<head>Traduction</head>
					<p>Ne pas approcher en état d'ébriété ni en vêtements aux couleurs vives.</p>
				</div>
					<div type="commentary">    
						<head>Commentary</head>    
	
<p>This small regulation from Sarapieion C (on which cf. Siard) should belong to the cult of an Egyptian deity on Delos, perhaps that of Isis (Hauvette-Besnault), though other gods are entirely possible; see immediately below.  The history of the sanctuary goes back to the early third century BC, and we know that Isis and Sarapis were worshipped here from this time (cf. Bruneau and Roussel). The stone was connected to another stone with a nail, on which we find a dedication to Zeus and Meter Megale on the command of Osiris. On this category of text as a sort of  ‘warning sign’, see Harris, p. 58-60.</p>
		
	<p>Line 1: As Plutarch describes (<title>De Is. Os.</title> 6), wine was strictly forbidden in the cult of Isis.</p>
	
	<p>Line 2: 'Flowery' garments may refer to clothing with flowers embroidered on them, or simply, to brightly-coloured or luxurious clothes. These are also forbidden in the cult of Despoina at Lykosoura: cf. <ref target="http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/CGRN_126/">CGRN 126</ref>, lines 3-6. Brightly-coloured clothes and other forms of luxury were also forbidden during the festival of Demeter at Dyme: cf. <ref target="http://cgrn.ulg.ac.be/CGRN_127/">CGRN 127</ref>, lines 5-6. Such rules seem aimed at curbing ostentation and promoting simplicity of dress; as Parker (p. 83 n. 36) explains, bright-coloured clothing may mark out a prostitute. Cp. also the schol. on Sophocles' <title>OC</title> 684 (referring again to Demeter).</p>


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